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Thyr, also known as the Path of Light, was the human Warren of Light.[1] It was anathema to Rashan, the human Warren of Dark. It was a derivative of the Elder Warren of Kurald Thyrllan. The Warren could not function over water.[2]

When Tattersail mentioned that she used the Warren, Tayschrenn was startled, suggesting that it was not an easy Warren to master.[3]

The Queen of Dreams was said to be the Mistress of Thyr.[4] High Mage Ussü speculated that Mockra was the child of High Thyr.[5] Corlo thought Meanas was also child of Thyr.[6]

Notable UsersEdit

In Gardens of the MoonEdit

Tattersail used a shield of Thyr to defend herself from the attack of a Hound of Shadow.[8] Later, she travelled through the Warren of Thyr, which was described as a tunnel through dark walls.[9]

In House of ChainsEdit

According to L'oric, Thyr was a branch of Kurald Thyrllan much like Tellann, the Warren of the T'lan Imass.[10]

In Night of Knives Edit

The Thyr mage Corinn created a portal for herself and Kiska to pass into the Warren of Thyr. The portal formed as if from the movement of air billowing from heat, followed by "grey streaks brightening into tatters of of purest glimmering silver". These tatters met and formed a floating oval of quicksilver which rippled like water.[11] Stepping though the portal was viewed as if the person was submerging into it.

The Warren itself appeared as a hall of mirrors, but one that only reflected if you had some form of talent with Thyr. Those entering Thyr together were not initially visible to each other, and Corinn noted, "Everyone walks their own path in Thyr." Despite this, she and Kiska were able to travel side by side.[12]

Those with some degree of Warren ability might see an infinite number of reflections of themselves. These reflections upon closer examination exhibited slight differences from the original individual. The viewer might see themselves as a beggar or a noble, horribly maimed or as a great champion, having fulfilled their life goals or having failed miserably. These images were described as possibilities and phantasms.[13]

It was possible for those trained with years of study to view Thyr in the manner that they wished. Corinn chose to view it as "a stone bridge over emptiness with blue sky all around." Doing so was described as safer, but as to why, was not made clear.[12] One could speculate that Thyr, like the other Warrens, possessed its own demons and guardians.

If someone, presumably with some skill in Thyr, was to think of a particular individual, it was possible to alter one of the reflected images to appear as that person, the mirrored surface rippling like a pool. This was presumably a form of scrying as it allowed remote viewing of an event happening at the same moment in time. It was also possible for some degree of communication between both the scryer and the viewed to communicate.[14]

In Return of the Crimson GuardEdit

Two Thyr mages accompanied Orlat Kepten as part of the Talian League force that attempted to capture the palace of Li Heng. The two mages conducted a battle ritual that covered themselves in flames linked together by ropes of fire. The intense heat caused the metal of the palace defenders' armour to become scalding and their bodies to catch fire. The attack was stopped only by Silk summoning the Kurald Liosan defences imbedded within the palace's stonework since the days of Shalmanat. Silk derided Thyr as a degenerate warren that was only a corrupted rivulet of Kurald Liosan.[15]

In Dancer's LamentEdit

Silk used the Warren of Thyr in several forms--most notably to see body heat, blind enemies with flashes of light, and to heat metal objects such as weapons held by enemy soldiers.[citation needed]

Speculations Edit

The ability of mages walking through the warren of Thyr to remotely view current events, combined with the Queen of Dream's use of Thyr, who was strongly associated with divination and pools of water, suggested The Path of Light could be considered a warren used for scrying.

Notes and referencesEdit

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